warranty-lawsIf you are like most consumers, you may not be aware of all the extra rights you have under federal or state warranty laws of your home appliances. If you realize that a residential refrigerator you purchased from a retailer is defective, even if that is after the expiry of the express warranty, you may still be entitled to get an appliance service, replacement, or full refund of your money. Such additional rights often apply within a reasonable period of using the product in your house, if the product is priced over $15 and if repeated attempts to repair it have not been successful.

For instance, if the written warranty of a household appliance like your refrigerator has already expired, but there is clearly a problem that makes it not to function properly, you will need to check out if your state laws protect you as far as implied warranties are concerned. Most state laws grant this automatic protection, and it is usually unwritten. Some companies may try to negate implied warranties using disclaimers or in some rare cases stating that they sell the product “as is” or “with all faults”. About 11 states prohibit selling products “as is”, not unless strict requirements are followed, including stating exactly what the product faults are.

Over the period any written warranty or contract for appliance technician service remains in effect, a company may be prohibited under certain state laws not to disclaim implied warranties. States laws that offer strong consumer protection may also allow you to claim incidental damages. These may occur, for instance, if your defective refrigerator ruins the food stored inside. There are many other types of protections you could consider taking advantage of to get service from appliance repairman, replacements or refunds. Of course, these protections cover a wide variety of products and not just appliances. Credit card warranties and chargebacks, lemon laws, recalls and even goodwill programs that some companies may offer, all could give you additional protection. Extended warranties or appliance repair contracts may not be useful because their costs are often higher than what you are likely to pay for the services of a refrigerator service technician if any faults occur at all.